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Tag: modern art

Minimalism and Meaning-Making: The Self-Referentialism of Frank Stella’s Black Paintings

Written by Erin Havens, Edited by Gabby Marcuzzie Herie
In 1959, Frank Stella unveiled his Black Paintings series at the Museum of Modern Art. Rejecting the tendencies du jour of Abstract Expressionism, Stella shocked and bewildered both critics and viewers with the bleak, repetitive systems of his Black Paintings.

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A Visual Language of Eroticism: Violence and Sexuality in Cézanne’s Male Bathers

Written by Thomas MacDonald, edited by Miray Eroglu
The paintings in Cézanne’s Bathers series, completed between 1859 and his death in 1906, are considered seminal works of modern art. Yet scholarship has generally neglected and devalued the eroticism present in his Male Bathers, which he produced alongside the larger and much more discussed and celebrated Female Bathers.

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“My Partner Wrote…With My Own Hand:” The Subversive Collaboration of Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore

Written by Brigitte Pawliw-Fry, edited by Aimée Tian
Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore first met as schoolgirls in Nantes, France, in what they described as “une rencontre foudroyante” (a lightning-strike connection),” thus beginning the artistic and romantic partnership that would span most of their lives. In Aveux non avenues, Cahun wrote of Moore: “My lover will no longer be the subject of my drama, [she] will be my collaborator.”

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A Gendered Exploration of Art, Trauma and Memory: Charlotte Salomon’s “Life or Theatre?”

Written by Nuala Murray, edited by Madeleine Cruickshank
In 1933, a momentous and ultimately catastrophic political shift occurred in Germany in which the promisingly liberal era of the Weimar Republic fell, leaving the nation in the hands of corrupt and monstrous dictator Adolf Hitler. During the Third Reich Jewish-German women, once advancing on Weimar’s progressive path towards both gender and racial liberation, were pushed backward and eventually fatally halted by the political, social and cultural tyranny inflicted on the nation by the Nazi Regime.

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Walking Photographs: Lisette Model as Flâneur

Written by Evelyn Goessling, edited by Aimée Tian
As mediators of urban spaces, the flâneur and the photographer do much of the same work. The flâneur is a wanderer and an anonymous explorer of urban spaces. The flâneur originated and thrived both as a literary and real figure in 19th century Paris, where after the Revolution an increase in industrialization, modernization, and commodity production made way for modern bourgeois life.

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