Skip to content

Category: Articles

Composing a Room of One’s Own: Feminine and Erotic Space in the Work of Vanessa Bell

Written by Thomas Macdonald, Edited by Émilie Perring.
Active between 1906 and 1961, Vanessa Bell was a prolific painter, interior designer, and one of the most consequential members of the Bloomsbury Group of artists, which included her sister Virginia Woolf, her husband Clive Bell, Duncan Grant, Roger Fry, and Dora Carrington. Despite her influence, critical attention to her work has long been inadequate and negatively gendered.

Continue reading Composing a Room of One’s Own: Feminine and Erotic Space in the Work of Vanessa Bell

Leave a Comment

Re-examining a Radical: The Subtle Feminism of Vanessa Bell

Written by Emma Carr, Edited by Tara Flanagan.
Vanessa Bell’s oil portraits of women in domestic spaces were seldom recognized as innovative during the second half of the twentieth century. Art critics trivialized her work and dismissed it as milquetoast rather than progressive.

Continue reading Re-examining a Radical: The Subtle Feminism of Vanessa Bell

Leave a Comment

Horror on the Margins: Embodying Otherness in Craft Media

Written by Erika Kindsfather, Edited by Aimée Tian and Miray Eroglu.
In the tradition of Western art history, craft as a genre of creation has been marginalized and excluded from the canon, undermined for its association with the feminine, domestic sphere. Recent scholarship attempts to rehabilitate craft from the periphery of the canon to a place of critical engagement.

Continue reading Horror on the Margins: Embodying Otherness in Craft Media

Leave a Comment

Minimalism and Meaning-Making: The Self-Referentialism of Frank Stella’s Black Paintings

Written by Erin Havens, Edited by Gabby Marcuzzie Herie
In 1959, Frank Stella unveiled his Black Paintings series at the Museum of Modern Art. Rejecting the tendencies du jour of Abstract Expressionism, Stella shocked and bewildered both critics and viewers with the bleak, repetitive systems of his Black Paintings.

Continue reading Minimalism and Meaning-Making: The Self-Referentialism of Frank Stella’s Black Paintings

Leave a Comment

Looking for an Audience: Princess Nokia, Afropunk Festival, and the Cultural Politics of Sound

Written by Alexa van Abbema, Edited by Aimée Tian
The amplification of the human voice, particularly in the context of a music festival, illustrates how speaking and listening are political phenomena signifying gendered, racialized, and classed subjectivities.

Continue reading Looking for an Audience: Princess Nokia, Afropunk Festival, and the Cultural Politics of Sound

Leave a Comment

The Urbanization of China’s Landscape Art: Contemporary Artist Yang Yongliang Reimagines the Ideology and Style of the Northern Song’s Landscapes

Written by Madeleine Cruickshank, Edited by Muhan Zhang
Contemporary media artist Yang Yongliang uses his work to draw attention to the discrepancy between China’s urban development and its artistic traditions. While Yongliang’s style draws on practices of the Northern Song Dynasty (960 to 1127), it should be critically assessed as a product of its contemporary framework instead of a seamless restoration of ancient practices.

Continue reading The Urbanization of China’s Landscape Art: Contemporary Artist Yang Yongliang Reimagines the Ideology and Style of the Northern Song’s Landscapes

Leave a Comment

Vaccination, A Victorian Victory and Vice: The Visual Chasm of Perspectives on Disease Prevention in Nineteenth to Twentieth Century Europe

Written by Elena Lin, Edited by Lily-Cannelle Mathieu
From wars to colonialism to the development of social infrastructure, infectious diseases have inevitably shaped history and our modern way of life. The advent of inoculation and vaccination as prophylaxes against contagion significantly improved the health of nations.

Continue reading Vaccination, A Victorian Victory and Vice: The Visual Chasm of Perspectives on Disease Prevention in Nineteenth to Twentieth Century Europe

Leave a Comment

A Visual Language of Eroticism: Violence and Sexuality in Cézanne’s Male Bathers

Written by Thomas MacDonald, edited by Miray Eroglu
The paintings in Cézanne’s Bathers series, completed between 1859 and his death in 1906, are considered seminal works of modern art. Yet scholarship has generally neglected and devalued the eroticism present in his Male Bathers, which he produced alongside the larger and much more discussed and celebrated Female Bathers.

Continue reading A Visual Language of Eroticism: Violence and Sexuality in Cézanne’s Male Bathers

Leave a Comment

The Baggage of the Colonized: Self-Conscious Othering in a Global Contemporary Art World

Written by Chaerin Kwon, edited by Catherine LaMendola
Humiliation, anger, and shame fill the bystanders who witness a group of labourers crawling on all fours across Champollion Street in Cairo, Egypt. On December 14th, 2009, members of the Cairo public became spectators to Amal Kenawy’s participatory performance artwork, Silence of the Sheep.

Continue reading The Baggage of the Colonized: Self-Conscious Othering in a Global Contemporary Art World

Leave a Comment

Zero Feet Away: How Grindr Has Impacted the Gay Community

Written by Quinn Lazenby, edited by Ashendri Wickremasinghe
Grindr is a geosocial dating app that allows queer men to connect with others nearby. Launching in 2009, Grindr now boasts more than 6 million profiles, with 2 million daily users hailing from 192-plus countries.

Continue reading Zero Feet Away: How Grindr Has Impacted the Gay Community

Leave a Comment