Eroticism in Repulsion: An Affective Reading of Carolee Schneemann’s “Meat Joy”

Written by Margaux Shraiman, Edited by Gabby Marcuzzi Herie. Abject art is a category used to describe artworks which explore transgressive themes and threaten our sense of cleanliness and propriety––specifically works that reference the body and bodily functions. The abject has strong ties to feminist theory, in that “female bodily functions in particular are ‘abjected’ by a patriarchal social order.”[i] Carolee Schneemann’s 1964 performance ​”Meat Joy”…

An Ambiguous Instant: “Oiran,” or Takahashi Yuichi’s Portrayal of a Plural Japan

Written by Lily-Cannelle Mathieu, Edited by Miray Eroglu. Takahashi Yuichi (1828-1894), a Japanese artist active in the early Meiji period (1868-1912), is known for having pioneered oil painting in Japan [1]. Born to a low-ranking samurai family [2], he abandoned his military functions to attend the governmentally-sponsored Institute for Western Studies, where he studied ‘Western art’ before being tutored by Charles Wirgman…

Transcending Common Understandings of Conceptual Art: An Analysis of Adrian Piper’s “What Will Become of Me” (1985, ongoing)

Written by Nicholas Raffoul, edited by Catriona Reid. Adrian Piper’s (b. 1948) works from the 1980s are often unevenly discussed in the literature of conceptual art, especially in comparison to her earlier and more recognizable works from the 1960s and 1970s. As a conceptual artist, Piper interrogates the power of institutions and her own place in the world…

The Affective Weight of Representing Sex Workers in the Context of Modernity: Toulouse Lautrec, Humor, Shock, and La Rue Moulins

Written by Brianne Chapelle, Edited by Miray Eroglu
Beheld retrospectively by the modern viewer, Lautrec’s representations of the can-can dancers, cabaret singers, and sex workers of Montmartre have been lifted into the “high art” realm. While his works now enjoy this elevated status in world class museum collections, they did not necessarily achieve this status in Lautrec’s lifetime, nor were they perhaps intended to do so.